Evillution

Dinos of a feather flock together?

The origin of birds has always been a major problem for Darwinism, and today there is little agreement about the evolution of birds. One of the most difficult issues related to bird evolution is the evolution of feathers. Feathers are complex, designed structures required for flight, and are today found only on birds. A literature review on the evolution of bird feathers shows the fossil record reveals a complete absence of evidence for feather evolution. The implications of this is a major difficulty for evillutionists and we will start a multiple part series delving into this.

Feathered_Dino_ig.qxp

A simple online dictionary: feath·er noun 1. one of the horny structures forming the principal covering of birds, consisting typically of a hard, tubular portion attached to the body and tapering into a thinner, stemlike portion bearing a series of slender, barbed processes that interlock to form a flat structure on each side.

Now let us look at the progressive Wikipedia for their definition: Feathers are one of the epidermal growths that form the distinctive outer covering, or plumage, on birds and some non-avian theropod dinosaurs. They are considered the most complex integumentary structures found in vertebrates, and indeed a premier example of a complex evolutionary novelty. *Immediately they throw in several other items that we will need to discuss and dispel or be accused of being ‘unscientific’ and not dealing with the ‘facts’*

Theropoda, (from Greek meaning “beast feet”) is both a suborder of bipedal saurischian dinosaurs, and a clade (is a group consisting of an ancestor and all its descendants, a single “branch” on the “tree of life”) consisting of that suborder and its descendants (including modern birds). Dinosaurs belonging to the suborder Theropoda were primarily carnivorous, although a number of theropod groups evolved herbivory, omnivory, and insectivory. *They placed (including modern birds) as if they in fact descendants of dinosaurs. Then they try to cover all possible bases by saying these dino-birds could eat plants, animals or insects- which covers all of the current birds. I just have a problem dealing with a dinosaur- no matter how small- eating bugs!*

Dinosaurs are a diverse group of animals of the clade Dinosauria. They first appeared during the Triassic period, 231.4 million years ago, and were the dominant terrestrial vertebrates for 135 million years, from the beginning of the Jurassic (about 201 million years ago) until the end of the Cretaceous (66 million years ago), when the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event led to the extinction of most dinosaur groups at the close of the Mesozoic Era. The fossil record indicates that birds evolved from theropod dinosaurs during the Jurassic Period and, consequently, they are considered a subgroup of dinosaurs by many paleontologists. Some birds survived the extinction event that occurred 66 million years ago, and their descendants continue the dinosaur lineage to the present day. *The record ‘indicates’ and ‘consequently’ they are considered … by many paleontologists. Some birds survived and …their descendants continue [to be] dinosaurs today. So we have to figure out what exactly the record indcates, who ‘they’ are and how ‘many paleontologists’ believe this- 90%, 50% or 5% of them. And I still have a hard time seeing an ostrich or an emu as a dinosaur but let us continue the exploration. We don’t want to be considered having a closed mind now do we.*

The integumentary system is the organ system that protects the body from various kinds of damage, such as loss of water or abrasion from outside. The system comprises the skin and its appendages (including hair, scales, feathers, hooves, and nails). *We normally consider it the skin but I guess hair, nails, glands and nerves are part of it. Hooves, feathers and scales we generally think about belonging to the hides of other animals.*

The Cretaceous–Paleogene (K–Pg) extinction event, was a mass extinction of some three-quarters of plant and animal species on Earth—including all non-avian dinosaurs—that occurred over a geologically short period of time 66 million years (Ma) ago. It is generally believed that the K–Pg extinction was triggered by a massive comet/asteroid impact and its catastrophic effects on the global environment, including a lingering impact winter that made it impossible for plants and plankton to carry out photosynthesis. *The walking dinosaurs all died off but the flying ones, the ones with feathers survived? What about the flying ones with leathery skins like bats- did they die also? If all of the plants on the earth died out then what did the birds eat- not insects because they should have died off also, right, because there were no plants. So these flying dinos had to be carrion type eating other species as they died during this event- like buzzards. For 66 million years!*

Well let’s call this part one. We have a bunch of definitions and suppositions to deal with here and I want to make sure I am able to state them as simply as possible for Gomer and Goober of Mayberry High to understand. So look forward to part two and three coming up soon.

 

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3 thoughts on “Dinos of a feather flock together?

  1. “If all of the plants on the earth died out then what did the birds eat- ” Didn’t you just state that three quarters of the species died, not all of them. Since we have no way of knowing what actually transpired, it may be possible that those that survived the years with low light and fallout, might have been able to adapt, eat whatever, not carrion, that would have been gone pretty quick, but sea weed etc. And a lack of fossil feathers may be nothing more than the fact that feathers don’t calcify the way bones do, it is possible that all dinosaurs had feathers, we don’t really know.
    “I just have a problem
    dealing with a dinosaur- no matter how small- eating bugs!”
    Why? I don’t have a problem with that. Andrew Zimmer eats bugs, I don’t have a problem with that either. I think that if hungry, EVERYTHING will eat bugs, they are everywhere.
    You need a different provider, this is the hardest blog site I have ever experienced to post replies. I tried this one and the other two other times each and nothing

    1. “If all of the plants on the earth died out then what did the birds eat- ” Didn’t you just state that three quarters of the species died, not all of them. Since we have no way of knowing what actually transpired, it may be possible that those that survived the years with low light and fallout, might have been able to adapt, eat whatever, not carrion, that would have been gone pretty quick, but sea weed etc.”
      The majority of the species that survived were the “fishes of the sea.” Adaption takes millions of years remember. To go from having serrated teeth in a bill to smooth bill (according to how evolutionists believe the current bills for gulls to eat mollusks, long thin stork like legs to stand on in soft marshy areas) as well as full fledged wings for dino-birds to fly over the water to scoop out the fish. Changes in the gullet to allow dino-birds to swallow stones to engage assist in digestion of plants. Not likely in time frame allowed.
      And a lack of fossil feathers may be nothing more than the fact that feathers don’t calcify the way bones do, it is possible that all dinosaurs had feathers, we don’t really know.
      Shooting a blunderbuss there to scatter enough buckshot of doubt over everything are we? Calcification isn’t the problem as I’ll show in part 2. Part 3 I’ll point out the fallacies in the scales to feathers scenario and part 4 I’ll deal with the bio-physiology of a variety of feathers.
      It’s bad enough that paleontologists had to give up the brontosaurus as a viable species but how frightening for them to think there were no ‘thunder lizards’ just giant fluffy birds.

      “I just have a problem dealing with a dinosaur- no matter how small- eating bugs!”
      Why? I don’t have a problem with that. Andrew Zimmer eats bugs, I don’t have a problem with that either. I think that if hungry, EVERYTHING will eat bugs, they are everywhere.
      If I got that kind of money, maybe I would eat bugs too—I think not. Yep, there are bugs everywhere and they would probably be able to survive a ‘catastrophic event’ as envisioned by the evolutionists. But my comment was poorly written I was trying to point out how could a 10 ton dino-bird eat enough bugs to supply homeostasis. During the millions of years needed to adapt and evolve in the manner estimated.

      You need a different provider, this is the hardest blog site I have ever experienced to post replies. I tried this one and the other two other times each and nothing
      I know it seems difficult but not necessarily so. On yours I try to comment using the options provided (Google account) and it takes me to my Google account and doesn’t allow me to comment directly. I had it so that you could post after the first one, but after the trouble I had with the hacking that got reset so all posts notify me and I have to approve them. I’ll wait a little bit longer before I take that off.

  2. Roy Marshall says:

    January 12, 2014 at 1:28 pm

    “If all of the plants on the earth died out then what did the birds eat- ” Didn’t you just state that three quarters of the species died, not all of them. Since we have no way of knowing what actually transpired, it may be possible that those that survived the years with low light and fallout, might have been able to adapt, eat whatever, not carrion, sea weed etc. And a lack of fossil feathers may be nothing more than the fact that feathers don’t calcify the way bones do, it is possible that all dinosaurs had feathers

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