Evillution, The Science of it All

‘Peacock’ fruit flies

fruit_fly

Science is Amazing  November 8, 2013

Evolution has resulted in some truly amazing creatures, but this is one beauty that we hadn’t seen before. Each of the transparent wings of the recently discovered fruitfly ‘Goniurellia tridens’ carries the likeness of an ant, right down to legs, thorax, head, and antennae. It’s thought that the fruitfly flutters its wings when threatened to give it the appearance of two ants walking back and forth, confusing the predator into abandoning the meal. All we know is that these ‘peacock flies’ are just another example of the incredible power of millions of years of natural selection. Read more here: http://www.thenational.ae/news/uae-news/science/fruit-fly-with-the-wings-of-beauty Image credit: www.thenational.ae   -P.

Blind faith = “All we know is that these ‘peacock flies’ are just another example of the incredible power of millions of years of natural selection.” I feel for these people and the delusions they cling to, unable to see the fallacies in their own statements. The first problem comes with dealing with the term “natural selection.” Selection is a term that implies the making of a choice, a decision. Synonyms include picking out, choosing, and preferring. A mindless process cannot “select” in this sense. The term “natural selection” is an oxymoron and its widespread use contributes to the pervasive confusion so characteristic of this topic.

Purpose, meaning or function can only be a derivative of thought. Material causes and random processes, which lack a mind, simply do not have the capacity to produce an intention in the first instance. Material causes cannot know or think. They can’t know the present, have knowledge of the past or choose to alter the future.

Fruit flys exhibit sexual dimorphism which is a phenotypic difference between males and females of the same species, meaning that there are obvious differences between the male and female of the species especially in regards to the reproductive organs. Humans are a perfect example of sexual dimorphism –(the male has an ‘outie’, the female has an ‘innie’).

While we know that errors can occur in the replication of the DNA strands (which end up causing a mutatable trait) we still are unsure of what the genetic process is to cause one trait to be recessive or dominant between the two gametes. Therefore, for the sake of the evillutionists argument we will concede that any change in the genetic makeup of the wing from clear to darkened will be dominant.

Since the exact process of mitosis in the fruit fly is unknown, I will also concede the point that one batch of gene DNA that has mutated to form a dark spot on one wing will somehow be exactly duplicated on the other wing during the entire process of development.

Female fruit flies are capable of laying hundreds of eggs within their brief life spans. Eggs are most commonly laid on moist, fermenting food masses such as overripe fruit and vegetables. Within 24 to 30 hours, fruit fly eggs hatch into larvae known as maggots. These maggots feed on the fruits within which they were laid. Within one week, maggots burrow through the decaying matter and molt. After five to six days, larvae move to a dry surface and transform into pupae. A few days later, adult fruit flies emerge-this is the point in time where the wings develop. However, throughout the developmental process at any time, the mtRNA, RNA or DNA replication process could have caused the darkening spot on the wings.

Fruit flies become sexually active within two days of emerging as adults. At this point we do not know if the female has a genetic disposition to more likely mate with a male that has a spot on its wings as opposed to those many, many more (at this point in time) who do not. But we digress, over millions of year, this spot, this blotch continues to mutate and grows in size and somewhere along the line part of it gets darker (creating what appears to be eyes) and narrowing down then expanding out and become oblong in shape (looking like a head and a thorax now). And again, while all of this is mutating, these flies are reproducing in sufficient number to start becoming a standard. But wait a minute, if we have hundreds of them reproducing, then did the genetic malformation continue to occur in each and every fly or just in one specific group.

We have also, somewhere along the line different lengthy spindles coming out of the spot or of the blotch and mutating in just the right directions to look like legs. Again, this supposedly would have occurred over millions of years. The end result is that somehow one fruit fly of this particular species managed to mutate the a portion of the coloration of its wings to look like an ant and it learned that if it flapped its wings, it would scare away ‘predators’ and it has at the same time become the dominate male for the female of the species (or I guess the females could have the wing differentiation also).

 

Let’s go back to the glowing statement: “It’s thought that the fruitfly flutters its wings when threatened to give it the appearance of two ants walking back and forth, confusing the predator into abandoning the meal. All we know is that these ‘peacock flies’ are just another example of the incredible power of millions of years of natural selection.”

They think, they don’t know and they want you to believe in what they say. Well, the biggest predator of the fruit fly is a wasp- but not to the fly itself but to the maggots. It stings the maggots and lays its own eggs into them. There also other insects that eat pupae and larvae and small rodents. But the biggest predator to the fruit fly is Raid and BlackFlag and the humans who use their Flying Insect Spray and Outdoor Defogger. And I don’t think that any flapping of the wings would make me scared of the supposed ant.

Easier to believe that an Intelligent Designer, knew for some reason we have yet to figure out, that this particular species of fruit fly in the environment it would be placed into needed the ornamentation on its wings and God said it was good.

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